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Don't Follow the Wind: why artists should go into the exclusion zone

2012年3月17日(土) - 4月1日(日) 12:00 - 20:00 /月曜休廊

‘Don’t Follow the Wind’ is a refrain we need to remember in today’s radioactive environment. It is also the poignant title of the inaccessible exhibition Jonathon Jones so crudely criticizes ('Apocalyspe No! Why artists should not go into the Fukushima exclusion zone' Guardian 10.07.2015). Jones is so busy pontificating on his nuclear beliefs he doesn’t tell us anything about the art project.

Nuclear Culture Research Group

The Nuclear Culture Research Group is an interdisciplinary group of artists, curators and scholars in the nuclear arts and humanities within and connected through Goldsmiths College, University of London. The group is part of the Nuclear Culture research project to develop artistic and curatorial enquiry into nuclear culture in the UK and internationally led by Ele Carpenter in partnership with The Arts Catalyst.

Field Note: Horonobe

Betonite clay, sellofane, stainless steel, vitrified high level radioactive waste

23rd July, 2014. I write in a small apartment in Sapporo, Japan, it’s at least 30 degrees, the sun sets quickly and the traffic is relentless. Last night I came back from a two day field trip to the north of Hokkaido with a group of artists and activists as part of the Actinium project in Sapporo. The aim of the trip was to experience that mythical journey deep underground to see the engineering and geological research into radioactive waste storage.

Panning for Atomic Gold

John Gast, American Progress, circa 1872.

The Arts Catalyst presents: A day symposium of quests for sensory perceptions of deep time through atomic materials and nuclear culture. Celebrating 20 years of The Arts Catalyst; drawing from the Arts Catalyst Atomic exhibition (1998), and looking to future nuclear archives.  Curated by Ele Carpenter with The Arts Catalyst.

Saturday 17th May 2014

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